Stand Against Racism – A Date with “Othering”

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Stand Against Racism – A Date with “Othering”

When:
February 27, 2019 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
2019-02-27T12:00:00-06:00
2019-02-27T13:00:00-06:00
Where:
YWCA Greater Green Bay
230 S Madison St
Green Bay, WI 54301
USA
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Renita Robinson
920-432-5581 x132

This event is a disarming way to get talking about tough realities during our monthly lunch and learn. During this courageous conversation titled “A date with Othering,” individuals who have been marginalized because of a group identity will travel around the room and share reflections related to experiences that shouted “You don’t belong in Green Bay!” Community members will hear brief reflections of these experiences and have time to ask questions at the end of the speed-dating styled exchanges. After the rounds of sharing there will be a brief discussion of similarities between the othered individuals’ experiences–we will be learning and growing together.

What exactly is “Othering?”

We are defining “othering” as a set of dynamics, processes, and structures that engender marginality and persistent inequality across any of the full range of human differences based on group identities. While not entirely universal, the core mechanisms that engender marginality are largely similar across contexts. Dimensions of othering include, but are not limited to, religion, sex, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status (class), disability, sexual orientation, and skin tone. Although the axes of difference that undergird these expressions of othering vary considerably and are deeply contextual, they contain a similar set of underlying dynamics. Othering is a term that not only encompasses the many expressions of prejudice on the basis of group identities, but it tends to provide a clarifying frame that reveals a set of common processes and conditions that propagate group-based inequality and marginality. Although particular expressions of othering, such as racism or ethnocentrism, are often well recognized and richly studied, this broader phenomenon is inadequately recognized as such. Excerpt from The problem of Othering: Towards Inclusiveness and Belonging. http://www.otheringandbelonging.org/the-problem-of-othering/